Book cloth

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Intro[edit]

Definition: en:A generic term for the woven fabrics used in covering books. They are usually, but by no means always, woven cotton fabrics, which may be bleached or mercerized, dyed, filled with pigment colors, gelatinized, starched, coated or impregnated, calendered, and embossed (grained). (Note: Cloth as a covering material for books is said to have been introduced, in England, by William Pickering, possibly as early as 1821-23, although books bound in burlap go back to the 1760s. Pickering's cloth was calico, a soft clothing material which disintegrated in the presence of glue unless it was lined with paper.ARCHIBALD LEIGHTON is generally credited with being the first to introduce a really durable cloth for covering books. The first true book cloth was a dyed and glazed calico, prepared with a starch filler to make it resistant to the moisture in glue. The first cloth had little character and was aesthetically unpleasant. It was also without natural texture and the threads gave it a somewhat raw and unfinished appearance. What was needed was some sort of decoration which would make the threads less obvious. When this came about, it took the form of embossed grains worked on the material, either in the roll or piece. One of the earliest designs, introduced in 1831, was a water finish, which may have been an outgrowth of the watered silk patterns that were introduced in 1828; it was used only for a short period because of its high cost and poor durability. See also:CLOTH GRAINING . For several years following the introduction of cloth, it was the usual practice of binders to buy the cloth in its basic white color, and then have it dyed, filled, and otherwise prepared for use, or to dye and finish it themselves. Embossing was done at first by means of ribbon embossers, but this was expensive, and the larger binderies did their own embossing by means of manually operated, heated rollers. By the 1840s, however, the complete manufacture of finished book cloth had become a separate business. Notwithstanding its obvious advantages, it was not until the middle of the 19th century that cloth largely replaced paper in regular edition binding. The rapid increase in the use of cloth was largely due to the successful methods that were developed of blocking in gold on cloth-covered cases. It was then possible to give cloth bindings a finished appearance which enabled them to be compared favorably with hand-tooled leather and, therefore, acceptable as a permanent binding.)

Related terms[edit]

Language code"Language code" is a predefined property that represents a BCP47 formatted language code and is provided by Semantic MediaWiki.Translated termCitation referenceThis property is a special property in this wiki.Citation textThis property is a special property in this wiki.StatusSkos:scopeNote
deLeinenCitation needed!preferred
deGewebeCitation needed!preferred
deBuchbinderleinenCitation needed!preferred
enBook cloth1 Roberts, Don., et al. Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books : a Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. Library of Congress : For Sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., 1982.preferredA generic term for the woven fabrics used in covering books. They are usually, but by no means always, woven cotton fabrics, which may be bleached or mercerized, dyed, filled with pigment colors, gelatinized, starched, coated or impregnated, calendered, and embossed (grained).
estela de encuadernaciónCitation needed!preferred
estela de encuadernarCitation needed!alternate
ittela da legatoriaCitation needed!preferred
svKlotCitation needed!preferred
svLangweCitation needed!alternate

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References

  1. ^  Roberts, Don., et al. Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books : a Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. Library of Congress : For Sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., 1982.