Property:ScopeNote

From Multilingual Bookbinding Dictionary
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Showing 20 pages using this property.
B
A block of marble or fine lime stone, the top surface of which is dressed absolutely smooth and on which the gatherings were beaten. It would appear that in Germany the binders sat to beat books on low blocks whereas the Dutch binders stood to do this work.  +
C
grov, vevet lerret med tydelig struktur  +
A comb lining in which the lining is folded into a stub between the outermost and the next gathering at the joint, thus allowing the outermost gatherings to be sewn through the lining. It thus serves equally the functions both of a spine lining and an external sewing guard, but is classified here as a spine lining because of its similarity to a tabbed comb guard.  +
A piece of skin material (alum-tawed skin in the recorded examples) which covers in one piece all the raised bands on the spine under a cover with a slotted spine, but which does not extend to the head and tail ends of the spine.  +
There are two types of cover which may typically be found on a book, primary and secondary. The primary cover is the material that constitutes the immediate covering of the completed binding, but not including additional, secondary, covers such as chemises or decorated paper over a plain primary cover. For inboard bindings, the primary covering material is used to cover the boards and spine, either completely, as in full bindings, or partially, as in half and quarter bindings. In all case bindings, and bindings with external sewing supports and longstitch bindings, the case itself may also be the covering material, and thus serve a dual function as both primary covering (which therefore may be given a secondary, decorated cover) and structural component. A secondary cover can be added in addition to a primary cover (but cannot be a secondary cover unless there is a primary cover already in place), either as protection or further embellishment of the book. In the latter case they are often made from decorated materials (most often textile or paper), but purely protective secondary covers can be made made from plain materials such as tanned or alum-tawed skins or paper, or recycled paper or parchment. They may be contemporary with and part of a complete binding, or may have been added afterwards (sometimes many years afterwards) to suit the taste and needs of a later owner. Many bindings with primary covers in parchment also have a lining of white paper under the parchment, intended both to brighten the parchment and make it opaque and also to soften the parchment with the moisture from the adhesive used to stick together so that it could be moulded around the book. Such linings on Dutch laced-case bindings with boards were adhered to the fleshside of the parchment before the book was covered, and could not be described as primary covers, but linings on Dutch inboard bindings of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were usually adhered to the book before the parchment was adhered around it. Such lining could therefore be thought of as primary covers, but their intended use as a lining and the fact that they would never have been left as covers in themselves means that they should always be thought of as a lining of the primary cover and not as an actual primary cover. Some bindings with embroidered covers may have similar linings.  
F
Fastenings are used to hold a book shut when it is not in use. They can take a variety of forms and be made from many different materials, but their essential function is secure one board or cover to the other across the foredge of the bookblock and often the head and tail edges as well. Fastenings were in use from the earliest times, but after the introduction of printing and, more particularly, the near universal use of paper-leaved textblocks, their use gradually became more and more decorative and status-related (ie. for liturgical or ceremonial use), unless they are found on books which were intended to be carried about, in which case they retain a primarily functional purpose. Fastenings may also be found on enclosures.  +
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G
Books printed and bound for the gift market as distinct for the library or the general reading market. The bindings on gift books would either be richly decorated or covered in exotic material such as silk, or both.  +
Books printed and bound for the gift market as distinct for the library or the general reading market. The bindings on gift books would either be richly decorated or covered in exotic material such as silk, or both.  +
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I
In bookbinding, the process of inserting shaped pieces of tawed or tanned skin into identically-shaped cut-out areas in a cover in a technique similar to marquetry.  +
M
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O
Endleaves which originally had bolts on head, tail and fore-edges which have now been opened without cutting the edges of the bookblock.  +
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P
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