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A list of all pages that have property "Definition" with value "Bindings decorated with Gothic architectural motifs". Since there have been only a few results, also nearby values are displayed.

Showing below up to 25 results starting with #1.

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List of results

  • Sheep vellum  + (A term sometimes applied to VELLUM produced from the split skin of a sheep rather than the skin of a calf.)
  • Vellum binder  + (A term sometimes used in Great Britain to indicate one who hinds account books (blankbooks), as well as other stationery bindings. It derives from the time when stationery binding was referred to as "vellum binding.")
  • Ornament  + (A thing used or serving to adorn.)
  • Sectional post binder  + (A type of post binder, which can be expanded by adding more "sections", a type of metal post", which allows more pages to be added to the binder.)
  • Yoshino  + (A type of Japanese tissue paper.)
  • Thong  + (A type of sewing support made of narrow strips of vellum, leather, or alum-tawed skin.)
  • Copying press  + (A type of small press, originally used to copy letters.)
  • Binder's board  + (A type of stiff board made from paper, often used as the structural core of a book's boards.)
  • Machine stitching  + (A variation of side sewing, in which holes are drilled or punched through the gathered leaves and the book is then sewn twice, up and down through the thickness of the book)
  • Morocco  + (A vegetable tanned leather having a characteristic pinhead grain pattern developed either naturally or by means of graining or boarding, but never by embossing.)
  • Textile bindings  + (A very ornate style of fabric binding, popA very ornate style of fabric binding, popular in England and France during the Renaissance, and in England into the 18th century. The books were sumptuously bound in satin and velvet of various colors, and were often embellished with needlework in multi-colored silks, as well as gold and silver threads.silks, as well as gold and silver threads.)
  • Vellum parchment  + (A very tough handmade vellum paper, produced in England, somewhat similar in appearance to genuine vellum. It is said to he extremely durable and not easily affected by heat, mildew, and insects. Its equivalent in the United States is ART PARCHMENT .)
  • Manuscript  + (A work written by hand.)
  • Dentelle  + (An 18th century style of hook decoration, usually in gold, consisting of a combination of elliptical scrolls of slightly shaded leafy character joined to clusters and horders of great richness, resembling lace, and pointing toward the center of the cover.)
  • Hot-melt adhesive  + (An adhesive that must be warmed to a certain temperature before it can adhere to something.)
  • Alphabet book  + (An alphabet book)
  • Tawing  + (An ancient process of treating prepared hide or skin (usually pigskin or goatskin) with aluminum salts and (usually) other materials, such as egg yolk, flour, salt, etc.)
  • Wrapping bands  + (An early form of the clasp. In its earliesAn early form of the clasp. In its earliest form, which was on Coptic bindings, it consisted of a strap attached to the fore edge of the upper cover and wound around the book over the fore edge several times. with the end, which was fitted with an ornamental piece of bone. being tucked between the strap and the lower cover. Another strap was similarly wrapped around the head and tail.imilarly wrapped around the head and tail.)
  • Case hide  + (An expression used in Great Britain to describe a stained or otherwise colored leather, generally having a smooth, more or less glossy surface finish.)
  • Plate (illustration)  + (An illustration in a book, printed separately from the text often on a special paper.)
  • Leatherboard  + (An imitation leather typically produced by pulping and compressing scrap leather and wood pulp.)
  • Leather gauge  + (An instrument used to measure the thickness of leather, either in ounces or millimeters. See also: IRON (2) ; LEATHER SUBSTANCE TABLE ; OUNCE .)
  • American leather  + (An obsolete term for one of the varieties of enameled cloth made to imitate leather.)
  • Pellis  + (Animal skin, especially sheep or goat, prepared as a surface for writing or painting on.)
  • Steamboat boards  + (Any boards used for cutting books out of boards)
 (Bindings decorated with Gothic architectural motifs)
  • Rigid paper cases  + (Book covers in which a stiffener such as paste or other board is used to make the structure rigid.)
  • Gold and silver bindings  + (Bookbindings having boards overlaid with thin panels of gold or silver, often in hammered relief, and sometimes inlaid with ivory, enamel, or jewels.)
  • Gift-book bindings  + (Books printed and bound for the gift market as distinct for the library or the general reading market. The bindings on gift books would either be richly decorated or covered in exotic material such as silk, or both.)
  • Gift binding  + (Books printed and bound for the gift market as distinct for the library or the general reading market. The bindings on gift books would either be richly decorated or covered in exotic material such as silk, or both.)
  • Embroidered binding  + (Books that are covered by material embellished with needlework, following a design made specifically for the purpose of decorating a particular book.)
  • Marbling  + (Colouring or marking that resembles or suggests marble.)
  • Housings  + (Containers for books or other materials)
  • Tips  + (Corners, usually of parchment, found on thCorners, usually of parchment, found on the outer corners of boards with quarter covers and almost completely (sometimes completely) covered by the covering material used on the sides. They were often used by French bookbinders from the late eighteenth century onwards. from the late eighteenth century onwards.)
  • Steamboating  + (Cutting books out of boards, a number being cut at the same time.)
  • Marbled  + (Decoration in which a variety of colours cDecoration in which a variety of colours can be used to create patterns more or less accurately resembling the appearance of marble on sheet materials, bookblock edges, etc., by a variety of different processes (e.g. trough-marbling, run-marbling, hand-drawn marbling, printed marbling, etc.). In any description, the process should be defined as precisely as possible.hould be defined as precisely as possible.)
  • Reversible  + (Easily and safely disassembled to correct an error in conservation treatment or to replace worn components.)
  • Aldehyde tanning  + (Essentially a formaldehyde tannage. SeveraEssentially a formaldehyde tannage. Several aldehydes react with hide protein to prevent putrefaction, but only FORMALDEHYDE has been used to any extent in the manufacture of leather. Formaldehyde is soluble in water, the resultant solution generally being known as FORMALIN . Aldehyde tanning is used principally in tanning white, washable leathers, usually sheep or lambskins, with the grain split or shaved off. Such leathers are seldom used in bookbinding. See also: ZIRCONIUM TANNING .bookbinding. See also: ZIRCONIUM TANNING .)
  • Fastenings  + (Fastenings are used to hold a book shut whFastenings are used to hold a book shut when it is not in use. They can take a variety of forms and be made from many different materials, but their essential function is secure one board or cover to the other across the foredge of the bookblock and often the head and tail edges as well. Fastenings were in use from the earliest times, but after the introduction of printing and, more particularly, the near universal use of paper-leaved textblocks, their use gradually became more and more decorative and status-related (ie. for liturgical or ceremonial use), unless they are found on books which were intended to be carried about, in which case they retain a primarily functional purpose. Fastenings may also be found on enclosures.astenings may also be found on enclosures.)
  • Pressing boards  + (Flat boards of solid or laminated wood, or fiberboard, used to insure even pressure when books are pressed.)
  • Book cloth  + (General term for the cloth used to cover a binding.)
  • Cake glue  + (Generally, an animal glue supplied in large slabs up to 3 inches in thickness. The slabs are broken into small pieces, soaked in cold water until they absorb as much water as possible, and then heated to useable consistency.)
  • Leather defects  + (Imperfections in the grain surface or struImperfections in the grain surface or structure of a hide or skin resulting in unsightly appearance and/ or weakness of the resultant leather. Such defects may have arisen during the life of the animal, or may have developed in the flaying and/or preparation of the stock.e flaying and/or preparation of the stock.)
  • Acid-free paper  + (In principle, papers which contain no freeIn principle, papers which contain no free acid and have a pH value of 7.0 or greater. In practice, papermakers consider a paper having a pH value of 6.0 or greater to be acid free. Such papers may be produced from cotton fibers, rags, esparto, jute, chemical wood pulps, or virtually any other fiber, with special precautions being taken during manufacture to eliminate any active acid that might be present in the paper pulp. However free of acid the paper may be immediately after manufacture, the presence of residual chlorine from bleaching operations, aluminum sulfate (alum) from sizing, or sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere, may lead to the formation of hydrochloric or sulfuric acid unless the paper has been buffered with a substance capable of neutralizing acids. See also: ALKALINE RESERVE .lizing acids. See also: ALKALINE RESERVE .)
  • Goatskin  + (Leather made from the skin of a goat)
  • Hair sheep  + (Leather made from the skin of a sheep thatLeather made from the skin of a sheep that grows hair instead of wool The hair sheep is found in the mountainous regions of India, China, South America, and Africa. The leather produced form these skins has a finer and tougher grain than that made from wool-bearing sheep.in than that made from wool-bearing sheep.)
  • Illumination  + (Manuscript adorned by hand with richly coloured ornamental letters, decorative designs, or illustrations.)
  • Crushed morocco  + (Morocco leather that has had its grain surface crushed to the extent that it is smooth.)
  • Vellum  + (Originally, a translucent or opaque materiOriginally, a translucent or opaque material produced from calfskin that had been soaked, limed and unhaired, and then dried at normal temperature under tension, usually on a wooden device called a stretching frame. Today, however, vellum is generally defined as a material made from calfskin, sheepskin, or virtually any other skin obtained from a relatively small animal, e.g., antelope. Some authorities do not even distinguish between vellum and parchment, although traditionally the former was made from an unsplit calfskin, and consequently had a grain pattern on one side (unless removed by scraping). while the latter was produced from the flesh split of a sheepskin, and consequently had no grain pattern. The important distinction between vellum (or parchment) and leather is that the former is not tanned hut is prepared essentially by soaking the skin in lime and drying it under tension. skin in lime and drying it under tension.)
  • Ledger paper  + (Originally, a writing paper used for pen aOriginally, a writing paper used for pen and ink records, as in ledger or blankbooks, but now also used for printing purposes. Ledger papers are generally made from cotton fiber, bleached chemical wood pulps, or mixtures thereof. High quality ledger papers are animal sized, and the usual ledger paper is made in basis weights ranging from 24 to 36 pounds (17 x 22�). As it is subjected to considerable usage, it requires a high degree of durability and permanence. Significant properties include strength, especially tearing resistance, erasability, water and ink resistance, uniformity of surface and color, smoothness, and a good surface for ruling.smoothness, and a good surface for ruling.)
  • Account-book paper  + (Originally, a writing paper used for pen aOriginally, a writing paper used for pen and ink records, as in ledger or blankbooks, but now also used for printing purposes. Ledger papers are generally made from cotton fiber, bleached chemical wood pulps, or mixtures thereof. High quality ledger papers are animal sized, and the usual ledger paper is made in basis weights ranging from 24 to 36 pounds (17 x 22). As it is subjected to considerable usage, it requires a high degree of durability and permanence. Significant properties include strength, especially tearing resistance, erasability, water and ink resistance, uniformity of surface and color, smoothness, and a good surface for ruling.smoothness, and a good surface for ruling.)